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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Dec 28, 2011
In our continuing discussino aboutr Pragmatic REST API design, let's talk about what happens when a response comes back. You have an object with data attributes on it. How should you name the attributes? Here are... Read more
In a recent post in this series about Pragmatic REST API design, I talked about formats - supporting multiple formats and working with JSON as the default. This time, let's talk about what happens when a response comes back.
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Dec 28, 2011
Let's continue our discussion on pragmatic REST API design by exploring formats.  Should you support only one format or multiple formats? I recommend that you support more than one format - that you push... Read more
Let's continue our discussion on pragmatic REST API design by exploring formats.  Should you support only one format or multiple formats? I recommend that you support more than one format - that you push things out in one format and accept as many formats as necessary. You can usually automate the mapping from format to format. Here's what the syntax looks like for a few key APIs Google Data ?alt=json Foursquare /venue.json Digg* Accept: application/json ?type=json
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Dec 23, 2011
Let's talk about pagination and partial response. How do you give developers exactly the information they need? Partial response Take for example the Twitter API - a request for a tweet. You'll get much more... Read more
Let's talk about pagination and partial response. How do you give developers exactly the information they need? Partial response Take for example the Twitter API - a request for a tweet. You'll get much more than a typical twitter app often needs - including the name of person, the text of the tweet, a timestamp, how often the message was retweeted, and a lot of metadata. Let's look at how several leading APIs handle giving developers just what they need in responses, including Google who pioneered the idea of partial response. LinkedIn /people:(id,first-name,last-name,industry) This request on a person returns ID, first name, last name, and industry.
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Dec 06, 2011
Versioning is one of the most important considerations when designing your pragmatic API. Never release an API without a version and make the version mandatory. Let's see how three top API providers handle... Read more
In the last post in this series about Pragmatic REST API design, I talked about designing error conditions in your APIs. This time - versioning - one of the most important considerations when designing your pragmatic API.
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Dec 05, 2011
Editor's note: We've got an updated eBook on the topics covered in this blog series: Web API Design: The Missing Link. In previous discussions about pragmatic REST API design, I talked about simplyfing... Read more
Error handling is an important piece of the puzzle for any software developer but especially for API designers. Learn more about good error design and why it's important in this guide.
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Nov 30, 2011
In the previous post in this series about Pragmatic REST API design, I talked about choosing plural versus singular nouns and concrete names over abstract. See RESTful API Design: plural nouns and concrete names. This... Read more
In the previous post in this series about Pragmatic REST API design, I talked about choosing plural versus singular nouns and concrete names over abstract. See RESTful API Design: plural nouns and concrete names. This time we'll explore API design considerations when handling associations between resources and parameters like states and attributes.
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Technology
by Brian Mulloy Nov 29, 2011
In the first post in this series, Are you a Pragmatist or a RESTafarian?, I proposed that "pragmatic REST" is a design issue. In the second post, RESTful API Design: nouns are good, verbs are bad, I outlined... Read more
In the first post in this series, Are you a Pragmatist or a RESTafarian?, I proposed that "pragmatic REST" is a design issue. In the second post, RESTful API Design: nouns are good, verbs are bad, I outlined some of  the API design practices that work well: Nouns in URLs are good. Verbs are bad. Try to limit your API to 2 base URLs per resource. This time, we'll explore how to pick the nouns for your URLs. Plural nouns are better than singular Should you choose singular or plural nouns? You'll see popular APIs use both. Let's look at a few examples  - key resources for these businesses are expressed as either singular or plural:Foursquare /checkinsGroupOn /dealsZappos /Product
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